The Men

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T W Y

INGS, KENNETH

Rank:
Service No:
Date of Death:
Age:
Regiment/Service:

Text on stone:





Grave Reference:

Rank:
Service No:
Date of Death:
Age:
Regiment/Service:
Grave Reference:
Text on the stone:


Private
14706556
30/09/1944
19
II. C. 20.
Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry 1st Bn.
The love that never falters the love that pays the price and makes, undaunted,  the final sacrifice

Additional Information:
Son of William Bertie and Elsie May Ings, of Snelston, Derbyshire.

Private Kenneth Ings was born on 5-9-1925 in Snelston, a small village close to the market town of Ashbourne, in Derbyshire. He went to school in Norbury, a neighbouring village, until the age of 14 when he went to work on local farms. He signed up at the age of 18 but was killed in action soon after at the age of 19. Ken was one of nine children of Elsie-May and William Bertie Ings, six boys and three girls, from which four of the boys went to war. John Rupert (Jack) was in the navy and went down on the Exeter and later died in a Japanese prison camp. Stan was missing feared dead for 2 years after escaping from a prison camp in Italy, but did come home. Reginald Bevan won the Military Medal for bravery. Ken, the youngest, was killed in action. This must have been a dreadful time for their mother and she later dedicated a bible to her sons which is in Snelston Church to this day.

He was one of 9 children of William Herbert (“Bertie”) Ings and Elsie (nee Rawlins). Kenneth grew up in Ashbourne and his family were still living there in 1939. At some point during the 2nd World War, Kenneth enlisted as a Private in the 1st Battalion of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire (‘Ox and Bucks’) Light Infantry. At the time he joined up, his place of residence was given as Lincolnshire.

He died of wounds in the fieldhospital in the village of Meerveldhoven and initially buried there.

Original gravesite at Meerveldhoven.